Delhi, capital city of the Federal Republic of India. It is one of India's fastest growing cities. It has sprawled over the West Bank of the river Yamuna, straddling the river. The city has two distinct parts, Old Delhi & New Delhi. Delhi is the second most widely used entry point into the country, being on the route of most major airlines. It is well linked by rail, air and road to all parts of the country. The remains of seven distinctive capital cities - among them Shahjahanabad and Qutub Minar - can be seen. Here, museums, art galleries and cultural centers attract the finest exhibitions

Red Fort or Lal Quila

The mughal emperor, Shah Jahan, Red Fort - Delhiafter ruling from Agra for elleven years, decided to shift to Delhi and laid the foundation stone of the Red Fort in 1618. It is called so because of the red stone with which it is built, the Red Fort is one of the most magnificent palaces in the world. India's history is also closely linked with this fort. It was from here that the British deposed the last Mughal ruler, Bahadur Shah Zafar, marking the end of the three century long Mughal rule. It was also from its ramparts that the first Prime Minister of India, pandit Jawharlal Nehru, announced to the nation that India was free form colonial rule.

Jama Masjid

Work on the Jama Masjid mosque was begun in 1650 by the Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan to complement his palace at the Red Fort. More than 5,000 workers toiled for six years to complete the largest mosque in India. Every Friday, the emperor and his retinue would travel in state from the fort to the mosque to attend the congressional prayers. A fine example of Mughal architecture, the Jama Masjid has three gateways.

Akshardham Temple

Akshardham Temple Swaminarayan Akshardham in New Delhi epitomizes 10,000 years of Indian culture in all its wonderful splendor, beauty, wisdom and bliss. It brilliantly showcases the spirit of India’s earliest architecture, traditions and timeless spiritual messages. The Akshardham experience is an enlightening journey through India’s magnificent art, values and contributions for the progress, happiness and harmony of mankind.

Qutub Minar

The origins of Qutab Minar are shrouded in controversy. Qutub Minar - DelhiSome believe it was erected as a tower of victory to signify the beginning of the Muslim rule in India. Others say it served as a minaret to the muezzins to call the faithful to prayer. No one can, however, dispute that the tower is not only one of the finest monuments in India, but also in the world. Qutab-ud-din Aibak, the first Muslim ruler of Delhi, commenced the construction of the Qutab Minar in 1200 AD, but could only finish the basement. His successor, Iltutmush, added three more storeys, and in 1368, Firoz Shah Tughlak constructed the fifth and the last storey.

Humayun's Tomb

The Mughals brought with them a love for gardens, fountains and water. The first mature example of Mughal architecture in India, Humayun's Tomb was built by the emperor's grieving widow, Haji Begum, in 1565 AD. Constructed with red sandstone and ornamented marks the beginning of a new tradition of ornate style, which culminated in the Taj Mahal of Agra. Designed by the Persian architect, Mirza Ghyas, Humayun's Tomb shows a marked shift from the Persian tradition of using coloured tiles for ornamentation. Located in the midst of a large square garden, screened by high walls, with gateways to the south and west, the tomb is a square tower surmounted by a magnificent marble dome. The dome stands 140 feet from the base of the terrace and is topped with a copper pinnacle. In addition to the remains of Humayun, the complex also houses the grave of many other distinguished members of the Mughal dynasty.

Jantar Mantar

At first sight, the Jantar Mantar appears like a gallery of modern art. It is, however, an observatory. Sawai Jai Singh II of Jaipur (1699-1743), a keen astronomer and a noble in the Mughal court, was dissatisfied by the errors of brass and metal astronomical instruments. Under patronage from the emperor, he set on himself the task of correcting the existing astronomical tables and updating the almanac with more reliable instruments. Delhi's Jantar Mantar is the first of the five observatories that he built with large masonry instruments. The observatory has the Samrat Yantra, a simple equal hour sun dial, the Ram yantra for reading altitudinal angles; Jai Prakash for ascertaining the position of the sun and other celestial bodies, and the Misra Yantra which is a combination of four scientific gadgets.

Lotus Temple

Lotus Temple In the heart of Delhi, the bustling capital of India, a lotus-shaped outline has etched itself on the consciousness of the city's inhabitants, capturing their fancy, fuelling their curiosity, and revolutionizing the concept of worship. With the dawning of every new day, an ever-rising tide of visitors surges to its doorsteps to savour its magnificence and bask in its serenely spiritual atmosphere.

Parliament House(Sansad Bhavan)

Parliament House(Sansad Bhavan) of Delhi is an important venue for world's largest democracy events. Also called as Sansad Bhawan Security guards protects the building round the clock. Here, official bills are passed and foreign relation are discussed by Ministry of External Affairs. It is situated on the northwest direction of Vijay Chowk and is in close proximity to the Secretariat buildings at the end of Parliament Street in Central Delhi.